The inuit people of north america

These 10 facts about space will blow your mind The Inuit people are an indigenous people native to the Arctic regions of North America, as well as parts of Greenland. Inuit settlements can also be found in regions of Russia. The history of these peoples is long and complex, and these native North Americans have a rich and colorful culture.

The inuit people of north america

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Cultural and technological advancements[ edit ] The various peoples of the Alaskan coasts had in that period developed entirely new techniques for hunting and fishing; these technologies also fundamentally changed their lifestyle and culture.

Developments included boats constructed of watertight seal skin stretched over wooden frames such as the kayak Inuktitut: These technologies enabled the hunting of whaleswhich provided a valuable source of food especially whale skin, rich in vitamin C and expanded the range of available materials to be processed for construction bones and skin and heating whale oil.

The development of dog sleds and of igloos that could be entered by a tunnel provided easier travel for the people and warmer dwellings during the winter. All of these advances promoted the formation of new social, religious, and artistic values. The wave of Thule migrations[ edit ] The warmer climate of North America in CE increased the amount of habitable territory in the Arctic and contributed to population growth.

Presumably, this development, along with the constant pursuit of quarry into higher latitudes and the search for meteorite iron, was a major impetus for the migration of the Alaskan Thule into northern Canada and Greenland.

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In the so-called "second migration", some of the displaced groups migrated south, settling in the Hudson Bay area. As Inuit myths explain, the Dorset-culture residents were assimilated by the technologically superior Thule in most areas but were massacred in others.

The Dorset culture subsequently died out throughout the Arctic in a short period around CE. They held out for a few centuries longer in northern Labrador and in the Ungava region until about CE ; the isolated Sadlermiut survived until the early 20th century on the southern coasts of Southampton Island and two islands nearby, Walrus Island and Coats Island.

They originated from the area around the Bering Strait, but are named the Thule after the location of the first traces of their settlements to be excavated: Thule dwellings[ edit ] Whalebone house with reconstructed whalebone domenear Resolute The typical Thule house was constructed from a framework of whale jawbones and ribs anchored in the tundra soil with rocks.

Animal hides were stretched over the frame, which was covered with sod. As accommodations for long hunting trips, the Thule used hide-tents in the summer. Artistic activities[ edit ] Inunnguaq, "like a human form" Inuksuk While the artistic productions of the Dorset were almost exclusively shaped by shamanistic ritual and myths, such influences are barely detectable in Thule art.

The utensils discovered in excavations of well-preserved Thule dwellings show only decorative incisions. These utensils were almost entirely functional, with no ritual purpose.

Small figurative carvings in ivory of female figures, water birds, and whales have also been found in Thule sites, but in relatively small numbers. Occasionally water birds would be depicted with the heads of women and vice versa, but such shamanistic carvings are few among the already small proportions of figurative carvings in Thule art.

The inuit people of north america

Among the art of the Thule, the depictions of bears especially contrasts with the art of the Dorset. In Dorset art, bears are realistically depicted within stylistic conventions; today, these objects are interpreted as spirit-helpers or amulets against dangers encountered in the hunt.

In Thule art, images of bears are limited to carved bear heads that attached to harpoon shafts. Whether they served a decorative or functional purpose is uncertain probably both. The Thule used bear teeth as jewellery, or hunting trophies.

The artefacts left by the Thule generally suggests that they led a more comfortable lifestyle and had leisure time to artistically decorate their personal effects- their art was not the result of social or economic anxieties. They constructed diverse and numerous Inuksuit like a manpiled-stone landmarks that survive.

Some are examples of an impressive art form. Transitional phase —19th century [ edit ] From the beginning of the 14th century, a gradual cooling occurred throughout the Canadian Archipelago and the Arctic Ocean coast of the mainland.

The effect of the drop in temperature upon the hunting-dependent lifestyle of the Thule was significant. Entire regions of the high Arctic were depopulatedpartly by mass migrations but also by the starvation of entire communities.The Inuit people are an indigenous people native to the Arctic regions of North America, as well as parts of Greenland.

Inuit settlements can also be found in regions of Russia. The Inuit diaspora describes the people of Inuit culture who have left their homeland and settled in other areas of the world for whatever reason, economic, political, or social.

The homeland of the Inuit spreads across most of the northern-most regions of North America along the Arctic Ocean (about miles).

Europeans in North America used to refer to the Inuit as Eskimos, but the people consider that term pejorative. The primary reason some people consider Eskimo derogatory is the questionable but widespread perception that in Algonquian languages it means "eaters of raw meat." One Cree speaker suggested the original word that became corrupted to Eskimo might indeed have been askamiciw .

Inuit communities are found in the Arctic, in the Northwest Territories, Labrador and Quebec in Canada, above tree line in Alaska (where people are called the Inupiat and Yupik), and in Russia (where people are called the Yupik people).

In some areas, Inuit people are called “Eskimos” however. The Inuit diaspora describes the people of Inuit culture who have left their homeland and settled in other areas of the world for whatever reason, economic, political, or social. The homeland of the Inuit spreads across most of the northern-most regions of North America along the Arctic Ocean (about miles).

The first people to inhabit North America’s Arctic region are not the genetic ancestors of the modern-day Inuit Feb 12, Stefan Andrews For most people, the Arctic region of the North American continent is known for its harsh living conditions, extremely cold .

The Inuit People of North America: April